Off Their Plate doing its part to lift multiple boats

Image from Offtheirplate.org

In a recent post, I wrote about Jose Andres and the work his organization, World Central Kitchen, is doing to feed those in need and to support the restaurant industry. In looking for other organizations doing similar work to lift up local ecosystems, I came across a newer entrant, Off Their Plate. There’s also nice tie in to World Central Kitchen as that organization serves as a fiscal sponsor for Off Their Plate, along with CommonWealth Kitchen.

Off Their Plate is providing both meals to frontline healthcare workers and economic relief to its restaurant partners’ workers. As the organization’s website states,

“Off Their Plate began with a simple idea: rally around our communities and provide relief to tireless frontline COVID healthcare workers and impacted frontline shift employees.”

Offtheirplate.org

There’s currently a footprint in New York City, Los Angeles, Boston, San Francisco, Pittsburgh, Chicago, Seattle, Philadelphia and Washington D.C., and donors can direct funds to the communities they want to support.

It’s increasingly impressive to me that organizations like this have been able to spin up so quickly and make an impact on the communities they are serving. Off Their Plate appears to have been conceived almost over a 24-hour period by a Harvard Medical School student, with an initial launch in Boston and two chef partners. During the past 2+ months, it has already raised over $3.8 million, served over 380,000 meals provided over $1.9 million in economic relief to workers.

I’m drawn to the mission because there’s not a focus just on either frontline workers or the restaurant community. Off Their Plate lifts both, which further provides an economic impact to the cities in which it serves. It’s powered by volunteers to ensure 100% of the proceeds go towards helping these groups and >50% of the meal costs go directly to support restaurant workers. The image below is from the website and provides a representation of how everything works.

Image for Offtheirplate.org

Off Their Plate may not be able to serve every hospital or help every local restaurant worker, but it’s doing its part to be a good community citizen and serve groups who need aid during the pandemic. Another positive story of doing good during these unsettling times.

DISCLAIMER: While I provide information about charitable organizations and fundraising pages, I am not endorsing, providing recommendations or making a comment on the platforms’ efficacy. All readers should do their own due diligence should they choose to participate.